Cardinal Virtues: Justice

Virtue — even attempted virtue — brings light; indulgence brings fog.

-CS Lewis

Statue of Justice with sword and scales in front of a blue cloudy sky

Cardinal, in terms of virtue, I once thought a reference to the Catholic ordained.  It is not. Cardinal from the latin cardo, or hinge, like hinge on a door, seems to mean something more like important or critical or pivotal or to hinge on.

Justice, from the latin justus meaning uprightness. The nearest modern english fairness. We can hear it in the term righteousness. The Catholic Church teaches that this is the most important virtue and with good reason. The determination of right and wrong and then, of course, doing the right.  The knowledge of right and wrong.

The virtues are to be strived for.  Every bit closer we come, every bit more joyful we become.  The virtues seem to be concerned with others.  Not of self.  So much of what all the teachings are wrapped up in is the golden rule: treat others as you would have them treat you.  I find it interesting that this all hinges on how we treat ourselves.  Therein I suppose lies the mystery of the existence of God.

We all hold a distinct advantage in knowing that which is human, as we are, of course, human.  We all know that we ought to do so and so, yet we do not.  We all know when someone is being selfish; yet is it not just that which is the hardest to see in ourselves?  The hardest to admit perhaps.  Rationalizations abound of course, of course.  Still, I have come to believe that the brass tacks of the matter is this: we all know there exists a way we ought to act and we all know, if we admit it, that we ourselves, you and me, fall short.  The question then becomes where did this knowledge of the true way that seems to be within everyone us, this evidence of God, come from?

Perhaps the answer lies in the prophecy of Jeremiah:

Behold, the days come, saith the Lord, that I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel, and with the house of Judah: Not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers in the day that I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt; which my covenant they brake, although I was an husband unto them, saith the Lord: But this shall be the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel; After those days, saith the Lord, I will put my law in their inward parts, and write it in their hearts; and will be their God, and they shall be my people. And they shall teach no more every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the Lord: for they shall all know me, from the least of them unto the greatest of them, saith the Lord: for I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.

-A takeaway from Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis

As always good books, takeaways, stories, and/or lessons learned on the subject are most appreciated.